The Thing About Yetis

Arty Crafty Kids - Book Club - Book Review - Craft Ideas for Kids - The Thing about Yetis

The Thing about Yetis is a ridiculously cute picture book by Vin Vogel. My children fell in love with the fluffy, sometimes ‘crabby’ character with all its amusing expressions and antics. It’s an easy book for young children to follow and most importantly, relate to.

We talked about the activities we like to pursue in Winter and used the illustrations to discuss the emotions of the yeti; was he happy or sad? having fun or being a little mischievous? and from this perspective, The Thing about Yetis (US Link / UK Link )really comes into its own, as the illustrations compliment and expand the narrative beautifully.

It’s a fun, bouncy book with tons of humour  and your preschooler will love it!

Arty Crafty Kids - Book Club - Book Review - Craft Ideas for Kids - The Thing about Yetis

As always, we like to extend all book readings with an activity or craft and for The Thing about Yetis (US Link / UK Link ), we’ve created our own adorable Yeti.

Paper Plate Yeti: Materials and Supplies 

Paper Plate
Cotton Wool Balls
Stock Paper – White, Blue and Red
PVA Glue
Scissors

A copy of The Thing about Yetis (US Link / UK Link )

Arty Crafty Kids - Book Club - Book Review - Craft Ideas for Kids - The Thing about Yetis

To begin, set your arty crafty kids up with a paper plate, PVA glue and cotton balls. Separate the cotton balls and stick them to the paper plate to create a fluffy layer.

Arty Crafty Kids - Book Club - Book Review - Craft Ideas for Kids - The Thing about Yetis

Using coloured paper, cut out eyes, a nose and a mouth for the yeti.

Cut a piece of white paper into four strips – these will be used for the legs and arms.

Cut two mitten shapes and two ovals for feet.

And finally, cut a white pipe cleaner into 3 uneven pieces.

Arty Crafty Kids - Book Club - Book Review - Craft Ideas for Kids - The Thing about Yetis

To create a bit of texture, fold the strips of white paper into alternating folds and attach them to the mittens and ovals.

Complete the yeti by sticking the facial features directly onto the fluffy paper plate and attach the arms, legs and tuffs of hair (pipecleaners) to the back of the plate, securing with sticky tape.

Your arty crafty kid should now have a super cute and fluffy yeti all of their own to help bring the character of the The Thing about Yetis to life!

Arty Crafty Kids - Book Club - Book Review - Craft Ideas for Kids - The Thing about Yetis

Latest Book Reviews and Crafts 

Max and Marla – A story about friendship, perseverance and fun!

The Day the Crayons Came Home – A hilarious story that will have you and kids in stitches!

 

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The is a sponsored post for Penguin Kids. All views and opinions are entirely my own, for more information, please see the Arty Crafty Kids disclosure statement here.

Max and Marla

Arty Crafty Kids - Book Review - Craft Ideas for Kids - Max and Marla Snowy Owl Craft

Max and Marla is a gorgeous story about Max and his pet owl Marla. A simple story with a strong message: to become a ‘true Olympian’ it takes teamwork, perseverance and most importantly, friendship.

Arty Crafty Kids - Book Club - Craft Ideas for Kids - Max and Marla

Max and Marla with its beautiful illustrations and fun story line naturally lends itself to an open discussion with your child about the way the characters work together to overcome obstacles and their motivations for doing so; essentially, my five year old concluded that it’s about enjoying the process, playing and not giving up!

I was thrilled to see my child engage and connect with the story. I enjoyed our discussions and she was able to relate the central theme and message of the story to her own approach to tasks and activities.

The watercolour illustrations are thoughtful, fun and simply beautiful. They bring the story to life and were enjoyed by my elder child and toddler, who both fell in love with the adorable snowy owl Marla.

Arty Crafty Kids - Book Club - Craft Ideas for Kids - Max and Marla

Charmed by Marla, it seemed only fitting to put together a simple snowy owl craft that can be enjoyed by both preschoolers and older children.

Snowy Owl Collage : Materials 

A sheet of stock card
A sheet of white paper
Cuttings from an old book
Black & Orange tissue paper
Googly Eyes
PVA Glue

A copy of the Max and Marla
Book!

Snowy  Owl Collage

As an extension activity to Max and Marla
, the purpose of this craft is for kids of varying ages to create their own snowy owl independtly.

Arty Crafty Kids - Book Club - Craft Ideas for Kids - Max and Marla

To get started, prepare the body of the snowy owl by cutting a large oval shape from the book page. We used a page from the a book for the black print against the white, to represent the black flicks you would usually find on a snowy owl.

Next, cut out multiple black triangles from the tissue paper and circles for eyes. Also present the googly eyes to finish of the eyes.

And finally, cut two large wing shapes from the white paper and present all the materials, along with glue and a sheet of card for the base, to your child.

Arty Crafty Kids - Book Club - Craft Ideas for Kids - Max and Marla

Glue the oval onto a piece of card.

Arty Crafty Kids - Book Club - Craft Ideas for Kids - Max and Marla

Glue the wings onto the owls body and fill them in with black tissue paper.

Add a triangle for the beak, along with the circles and googly eyes.

Although a simple activity, its one that will appeal to a broad age group and a craft that could be replicated in conjunction within a group reading of Max and Marla. Going back to the book, I hope your fall in love with its charm as much as mine. Max and Marla has become a firm bed time favourite and is most definitely one for every preschoolers book shelf!

 

Arty Crafty Kids - Book Club - Craft Ideas for Kids - Max and Marla

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This post is a sponsored post and we received the book free of charge. All views and opinions are wholly my own, for more information please read the Arty Crafty Kids disclosure statement.

 

The Day the Crayons Came Home

Arty Crafty Kids - Book Club - The Day the Crayons Came Home Book Review

The Day The Crayons Came Home

The Crayons are back with a hilarious follow-up to The Day the Crayons Quit!

We’ve all found broken crayons lodged deep within the darkest depths of the sofa, under the bed, crushed up in pockets, alone in the toy box abyss or soaking in the bottom of the washing machine…right?  The Day the Crayons Came Home will have you smiling throughout, with that knowing acknowledgement of a familiar tale.

Arty Crafty Kids - Book Club - The Day the Crayons Came Home Book Review

Written in a similar format to its predecessor, Duncan receives a pile of postcards from his lost, broken and aggrieved crayons.

Turquoise has a stinky sock stuck to its head, while Neon Red has embarked on a world-wide jaunt to return home. Chunky Crayon can’t take the toddler scribbles and nibbles any more and after an unfortunate sunny accident, yellow and orange no longer care for the true colour of the sun.

Each crayon oozes personality, who are brought to life by the perfect mix of Drew Daywalt’s witty and punchy writing style and Oliver Jeffers fun illustrations. My five year old was desperate to turn the page to uncover the next story, enjoying the amusing situations of each crayon – especially embarrassed Brown crayon.  And true to crayon form, the book ends with a positive, creative message that may get your kids thinking about the treatment of their own crayons!

The Day The Crayons Came Home receives a big thumbs up from us. We loved the characters, the illustrations and if you’re looking for a new book to share with your kids or class to inspire imaginations and have a chuckle, The Day the Crayons Came Home will do just that and more!

You can pre-order your copy direct from the Crayon Book website!

Arty Crafty Kids - Book Club - The Day the Crayons Came Home Book Review

To celebrate the launch  of The Day the Crayons Came Home, the Crayon Book website is jam-packed with fantastic activities for kids and teaching resources. Perfect for little ones to explore the book further, encourage story telling and create their own crayon characters! 

My little girl had a blast creating a postcard from her crayon character – pretty pink! Pretty Pink ditched the not-so-magical crayon box for fairytale land to see the lanterns featured in Rapunzal. As my girl immersed herself into character and the mindset of her crayon, her own story become increasingly more elaborate. From my perspective, it was great to see how The Day the Crayons Came Home had captured her imagination.

Click Here for FREE lesson plans and teaching resources!

Arty Crafty Kids - Book Club - The Day the Crayons Came Home Book Review

Download a FREE Maze and crossword here!

Arty Crafty Kids - Book Club - The Day the Crayons Came Home Book Review

And finally, have some fun and create your own crayon badge!

Our badge is definitely true for my pink loving princesses!

Arty Crafty Kids - Book Club - The Day the Crayons Came Home Book Review

 

Arty Crafty Kids - Book Club - The day the Crayons Came Home Book Review

This is a sponsored post and all views and opinions are entirely my own. For more information, please see the Arty Crafty Kids disclosure policy.

 

 

Owl Suncatcher

Arty Crafty Kids - Craft - Craft for Kids - Owl Suncatcher

There’s a certain irony about making a suncatcher on a rainy day, but that’s exactly what we did!

Our impromptu owl suncatchers were a huge hit with the kids and coupled with a reading of ‘I’m not Cute (Baby Owl)’, it was suddenly owl fever in the house, with the kids combining different colours to make the cutest of cute baby owls.

Simple crafts are always a popular with the kids, who could see the results very quickly as their owls took form. My eldest especially enjoyed practising her cutting skills.

To create our owl suncatchers, we used a laminator – a gadget I love using to preserve the kids paintings, school reports and photos. Using it to make suncatcher is a definite bonus!

Owl Suncatcher: Materials 

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Tissue Paper – Multiple Colours ( US Link / UK Link)
Laminator ( US Link / UK Link)
Laminating Pouches ( US Link / UK Link)
Scissors

Owl Suncatcher
Arty Crafty Kids - Craft - Craft for Kids - Owl Suncatcher

1. Start by cutting out a large roundish shape and place it into the a central position into the laminating pouch. This will become the owls body.

Arty Crafty Kids - Craft - Craft for Kids - Owl Suncatcher

2. Using different colours of tissue paper, cut out the shapes for the wings, eyes and tummy and layer onto the body until the owl begins to take form.

Arty Crafty Kids - Craft - Craft for Kids - Owl Suncatcher

3. Fold the pouch over and laminate.

4. Trim the Owl to remove the excess pouch and display in the window!

We only made a few owls, but could you imagine how amazing they could look as a window display within a preschool or school?

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Arty Crafty Kids - Craft - Craft for Kids - Owl SuncatcherRelated Books: 

Paper Plate Snail

Arty Crafty Kids - Books - Paper Plate Snail

Inspired by Sue Hendra’s charming story  ‘Norman The Slug with the Silly Shell’, our Paper Plate Snail is all about letting imaginations sparkle to create snails with very silly shells.

Paint zig-zags, spots, splats or stripes. Add glitter, tissue paper or dry foods such as rice and lentils. Anything goes, making it the perfect craft for young children to freely explore and bringing the hilarity of ‘NORMAN The Slug with the Silly Shell’ to life.

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US Link / UK Link

NORMAN The slug with the Silly Shell has been one of Angel’s favourite books for years. She loves Norman’s crazy antics and his determination to fit in with the snails. Its fun bouncy pace and beautiful illustrations keeps children entranced until the end.

I warmly recommend the book and supported by our super fun Paper Plate Snail Craft, it’s the perfect duo for some quality time at home or within a group preschool setting.

Paper Plate Snail: Materials

NORMAN The Slug with the Silly Shell (US Link / UK Link )
Paper Plate
Paint – A variety of Colours
Coloured Card or recycle an old cardboard box
Googly Eyes (US Link / UK Link )
Pipe Cleaners ( US Link /UK Link )
PVA Glue

Paper Plate Snail

Arty Crafty Kids - Books -Paper Plate Snail

Arm your kiddies with paint, glitter, lentils or any other material you have available at home and let them loose on the paper plate.

Arty Crafty Kids - Books -Paper Plate Snail

Draw the outline or a slug onto the card, giving it ample width to ensure the paper plate can be securely stuck onto it.

Cut the slug shape out.

Arty Crafty Kids - Books -Paper Plate Snai

Add a smiley face and googly eye (US Link / UK Link ).

Using a short piece of pipe cleaner, pierce it into the head of the slug and twist to secure.

Arty Crafty Kids - Books -Paper Plate Snail

To finish off, stick the paper plate directly onto the slug and leave to dry.

My own children thoroughly enjoyed our Paper Plate Snail craft, with my 19 month old Cakes having a go too!

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Sensory Play Monster Pizza

Arty Crafty Kids - Sensory Play Monster Pizza

Wowee, where do I start! My girls loved their Sensory Play Monster Pizza session. Cakes enjoyed exploring the different textures and colours, whilst Angel whipped up wriggly worm pizza’s with eyeball sauce and spider crunchies! Her bat special was monst-abulous! A grotesque sensory delight.

They both had a blast with this easy to prepare activity and to use the words of the little lovely, our Sensory Play Monster Pizza session was “awesome!”

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Arty Crafty Kids - Sensory play Monster Pizza

Our Sensory Play Monster Pizza was inspired by Claire Freedman’s Spider Sandwiches. A book we’ve read again and again and again. Its gruesome culinary combinations really tickles Angel’s sense of humour and captures her imagination. She loves to imagine her own bug-filled and gross meals that are always described in great detail with a cheeky snigger and a little chuckle.

The idea of mummy eating slug and earwax soup is a particular favourite! As such, we came up with the idea to have our very own Monster Pizza’s and if you’re looking for a book to make your little monsters imaginations sparkle, then Claire Freedman’s Spider Sandwiches will do exactly that!

Arty Crafty Kids - Sensory play monster pizza 4

 

Sensory Play Monster Pizza – What’s in it?

Arty Crafty Kids - Sensory Play

To maximise the ‘sensory’ element of our Sensory Play Monster Pizza session, I incorporated smooth, rough, squidgy, fluffy, wibbly and wobbly textures and used a range of bright and engaging colours, with some added sparkle to stimulate the all senses.

Most of the ingredients used are the basic staples found in most kitchen or bathroom cupboards (nothing too fancy or difficult to find), for instance: flour, spaghetti, salt, shaving cream etc

In terms of prep, much of the ‘monster mixture’ will need to be prepared the day before, however each element will not take long and it really is totally worth it!

Salt Dough Pizza Base

1 Cup of Plain Flour
½ Cup of Water
½ Cup of Salt
Food Colouring

Mix the flour and salt into a bowl and mix, gradually adding water. Keep mixing until you get a doughy consistency. If it’s too sticky, add more flour. If it’s too dry, add more water.

To create the marble effect, I added small droplets of food colouring directly onto the dough and kneaded it in.

To finish off, place the ‘pizza base’ into the oven on a low heat until nice and firm. Allow to cool before using.

Using a salt dough pizza base was fab, as they could be reused a few times and added a little bit of realism to the play.

Eyeball Monster Sauce

Really simple: Mushed up jelly and googly eyes.

Arty Crafty Kids - Sensory Play

Spider Cream

Can you guess how made our Spider Cream?

We used shaving cream and food colouring. Only a couple of droplets of food colouring is needed with a little stir to create this really cool marbling effect.

Arty Crafty Kids - Sensory Play

Wriggly Worms

I cannot believe how easy it is to dye spaghetti and I have to say, I love the results!

All you have to do is boil spaghetti until very soft and then rinse it with cold water until cool.

Separate the spaghetti into small bags and add a few drops of food colouring ( I used food colouring gel). Give the bags a good shake until all the spaghetti is covered and leave for 24 hours.

Before using our wriggly worms, I added a few droplets of vegetable oil to each bag to add moisture.

Arty Crafty Kids - Sensory Play

To complete our  Sensory Play Monster Pizza session, I added a few inexpensive creepy crawly extras to bring it all together and to not only invite play, but to make it irresistible.

The boring bits! 

Children must be supervised at all times during this activity and none of the ingredients used with our Sensory Play Monster Pizza session is intended for consumption. 

Arty Crafty Kids - Sensory Play

 

 

Watercolour and Ink

We’ve applied Watercolour and Ink to recycled book pages many times to create gifts for loved ones and they always go down a storm! everyone loves them and we love creating them.

I affectionately regard our Watercolour and Ink flower paintings as an “unintentional craft”. One quiet afternoon, I took advantage of a rare opportunity to partake in my creative experiment. In the middle of my creative splurge, Angel  pops out of nowhere with “I LOVE flowers, can I have a go?” and a mummy daughter special is created!

Water Colour & Ink: Recycling Books – Materials

Pages of an old book
A picture frame
Watercolour paint
A fine tipped black pen

Water Colour & Ink: Using recycled books

Onto an old printed book page simply pencil in the basic outline (in this instance) of a flower. Then fill it in, ideally using water colour paint. If you do not have access to water colours, try using heavily watered down acrylic or even food colouring.

Watercolour and Ink - Artycraftykids

To avoid soggy paper, encourage your arty kid to apply thin layers of paint. Water based paint can be fascinating for its marbling effect – Angel enjoyed using the palette to mix the colours as well as blending them onto the page to create different shades.

Once the painting is dry, use a fine tipped black pen (I used a Uni Pen 1.0mm) to enhance the outline of the flower. Pop into a frame and you have a beautiful memento or personal handmade gift.

Angel is particularly proud of her work and loves the “mummy daughter flowers”.

 

watercolour and ink - artycraftykids

Paper Plate Lion

Our Paper Plate Lion is not only cute, but really easy and fun to make!

Using a range of scrap materials, preschoolers can explore and experiment with different textures to create a wacky and wild lion’s mane; adding a sensory element to the craft.

Inspired by the heart-warming book The Lion Who Wanted To Love (Orchard Picturebooks) by Giles Andreae and David Wojtowycz, our Paper Plate Lion is the perfect accompaniment to a story about kindness, love and simply being yourself, even if that means you’re a little different.

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Paper Plate Lion – Materials

20 White 7″ Paper Plates – Only one paper plate is needed, but they’re always handy to have!
Orange and Yellow Paint
White card (for the eyes), we used a Cereal Box
Orange and/or Yellow Tissue Paper
Orange and Yellow Scrap Paper, Yarn or anything else you available –  we even used a yellow plastic bag!
Kid’s PVA Glue, Safe And Washable
Sharpie Fine Point Permanent Marker (Single) Black

Paper Plate Lion

When it comes to crafting with paper plates I would always recommend applying paint the day before. They can take a while to dry and if you have an eager crafty kid on your hands,  they may not appreciate waiting.

We often split our crafts in two, enabling an ‘invitation to create’ to be prepared. It’s always well received and as you can see, I cut up a variety of scrap materials into strips ready for the little lovely to turn her yellow and orange painted plate into a Lion!

Craft Ideas for Kids - paper plate lion

Ask your crafty kid to begin sticking the scrap materials around the circumference of the plate. For ease, I suggested following the orange ring.

Angel had so much fun assembling the lion’s mane and had a good go at creating a pattern with her scrap materials.

Paper Plate Lion 3

Using an old cereal box, we cut out two white circles and used the marker pen to create pupils.

Craft Ideas For Kids - paper plate lion

To finish off, I used the marker pen to draw a nice big nose and smile face! Enjoy 🙂